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ASEE PRISM
  American Society for Engineering Education
American Society for Engineering EducationSEPTEMBER 2007Volume 17 | Number 1 PRISM HOMETABLE OF CONTENTSBACK ISSUES
FEATURES
What Price Security? - By THOMAS K. GROSE
Team Player - ALVIN P. SANOFF
A Network of a Different Stripe - By DON BOROUGHS

DEPARTMENTS
COMMENTS
BRIEFINGS
DATABYTES
Refractions: Confusing Calendars - By Henry Petroski
ASEE TODAY
CLASSIFIEDS
LAST WORD: Why Not Here? BY CAROLYN WILLIAMS

TEACHING TOOLBOX
Click. Build. Learn. Digital K-12 engineering courses expand with stress on quality, fun. BY BARBARA MATHIAS-RIEGEL
JEE SELECTS: The ‘Random Madness’ of Work - BY JAMES TREVELYAN
ON THE SHELF: Chindia Rising - BY ROBIN TATU


BACK ISSUES







 
COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLISHER: New Features Debut in Prism Frank L. Huband
 


September for academics often seems to presage a fresh start—new beginnings. It seems appropriate, therefore, to mention several new items that begin with this issue of Prism.

Briefings” will henceforth open with a two-page spread highlighting engineering marvels, from the tourist viewing centers in the Grand Canyon to novel ways to catch the sun’s rays for energy. ASEE members will get some of the best of the Journal of Engineering Education in the “Teaching Toolbox” section, with the new JEE Selects. Seven times a year, selected research papers from the Journal will be adapted for your reading pleasure. Prism will also put additional focus on global issues—articles will often have an international aspect; books selected for review will often have a global outlook.

This month’s cover story, “Unfocused Funding,” examines the state of security-related academic research, and confirms that federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, have given higher priority to academic research that could bolster homeland security. However, the expected “wave of funding” has not quite materialized, and some graduate schools have been challenged by the post 9/11 clampdown on foreign students.

A Network of a Different Stripe” looks at the challenge and rewards of taking research out of the laboratory and into a demanding field environment—in this case, Kenya. A team of Princeton University professors and Ph.D. students worked, with varying results, to develop a wireless network where computers were carried in collars of wild zebras.

Patrick Harker is profiled in “Team Player.” A college football player turned engineer, Harker had a fascinating and unusual career but eventually became dean of Penn’s Wharton Business School. With the global economy a key interest, he expanded Wharton’s reach by opening INSEAD, an international institution with campuses in Europe and Asia. Last year, Harker was named President of the University of Delaware, and it appears a fine fit. Delaware was the first university in the nation to develop a program for studying abroad.

Al Sanoff wrote the Harker profile, and it will be his final contribution to Prism. At 65, Al died of pancreatic cancer in May. Over the past nine years Al wrote numerous profiles and trend pieces, and he wrote with style and insight. Readers who enjoyed his articles and staff who appreciated his grace and good humor will miss him.

Frank L. Huband
Executive Director and Publisher
f.huband@asee.org

 

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American Society for Engineering Education