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ASEE PRISM
  American Society for Engineering Education
American Society for Engineering EducationSEPTEMBER 2006Volume 16 | Number 1 PRISM HOMETABLE OF CONTENTSBACK ISSUES
FEATURES
Booting Up - BY THOMAS K. GROSE
Woman of the World - BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS
Getting in Gear -     BY JEFFREY SELINGO

DEPARTMENTS
COMMENTS
CONTRIBUTORS
BRIEFINGS
REFRACTIONS: Engineering and the City - By Henry Petroski
ASEE TODAY: President's Letter - Conference Highlights - 2006 Awards - Calls for Papers
CLASSIFIEDS
LAST WORD: Closing the Gender Gap - BY RAYMOND SIMON

TEACHING TOOLBOX
The Pod Squad - ENGINEERING PROFESSORS ARE LOOKING AT MP3 PLAYERS AS A NEW WAY OF ENHANCING EDUCATION.  - BY LYNNE SHALLCROSS
YEAR OF DIALOGUE: A Focus on Scholarship - BY RONALD E. BARR
BOOK REVIEW: Leonardo's Lost Robots - BY ROBIN TATU
ON CAMPUS: Ready, Get Set, Go!










 
COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLISHER: Lone Star SolutionFrank L. Huband  


The high-tech industry in Texas is second only to California’s, employing 446,000 people and representing a $30.4 billion payroll. In recent years, as the number of U.S. engineering graduates has shown little growth, a group of high-tech companies realized that the Texas industries have a long-term interest in increasing those numbers. Led by Texas Instruments, the group, which includes National Instruments, Intel, Hewlett-Packard, AT&T, Lockheed Martin and AMD, persuaded government and academia to join them in forming the Texas Engineering and Technical Consortium (TETC). The consortium’s mission is to increase the number of students earning undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering and computer science in Texas. “Turned On In Texas” highlights the successes of TETC. It appears they’re on to something—at TETC-funded schools, electrical engineering graduate rates are up 36.2 percent, and computer science rates are up 24.7 percent. Other states are turning their eyes to Texas to take some hints.

When talk turns to the need for the United States to compete in the global economy, discussion generally focuses on China and India. What hasn’t been widely appreciated is that Mexico has been quietly building up its infrastructure to educate more engineers. With 451,000 students currently enrolled in full-time undergraduate engineering programs, Mexico is joining the global competition in engineering. “Getting in Gear” examines these advances.

Frannie Léautier is head of the World Bank Institute, a branch of the World Bank that works to improve conditions in developing nations. “Woman of the World” profiles Léautier, who grew up on a coffee farm in the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro. Despite staggering odds, Léautier forged a path that led first to the University of Dar es Salaam, where she studied civil engineering, and eventually to MIT for graduate school. Léautier survived the enormous culture shock to become the first woman from Tanzania to earn a Ph.D. at MIT.

I am pleased to say my enthusiasm for Prism has been shared by the national publication and design community. Our editorial and design staff won 14 awards for Prism and one for Engineering, Go for It! I’d also like to call your attention to Prism’s new look, which makes the magazine even more inviting to read. Congratulations to ASEE’s publications department. I’m also pleased to note that Duke civil engineering professor Henry Petroski, author of numerous well-received books on engineering, will be writing “Refractions” every month this year, instead of every other month.

Frank L. Huband
Executive Director and Publisher
f.huband@asee.org

 

 


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American Society for Engineering Education