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ASEE PRISM
  American Society for Engineering Education
American Society for Engineering EducationOCTOBER 2006Volume 16 | Number 2 PRISM HOMETABLE OF CONTENTSBACK ISSUES
FEATURES
Trouble on the Horizon - BY THOMAS K. GROSE
Get SMART - BY THOMAS K. GROSE
Tulane's Next Move - BY JEFFREY SELINGO

DEPARTMENTS
COMMENTS
CONTRIBUTORS
BRIEFINGS
REFRACTIONS: ENGINEERING AND HISTORY - BY HENRY PETROSKI
CLASSIFIEDS
LAST WORD: The College Payoff - BY ANTHONY P. CARNEVALE

TEACHING TOOLBOX
Let Go of My Legos - Those little bricks are a wonderful way to teach engineering to youngsters. BY ALICE DANIEL
BOOK REVIEW: An Inconvenient Truth - BY ROBIN TATU
TEACHING: The Plague of Self-Plagiarism - BY PHILLIP WANKAT AND FRANK OREOVICZ
ON CAMPUS: The Write Solution- BY LYNNE SHALLCROSS










 
CONTRIBUTORS  

Thomas K. GroseThomas K. Grose, a frequent Prism contributor, wrote two stories this month: the cover, “Trouble on the Horizon,” an analysis of ASEE data, and “Get Smart,” which is about a new government program that helps aspiring engineers finance their education. A native of Detroit, he’s also spent many years in Washington, D.C. Other publications he writes for include U.S. News & World Report and the European edition of Time magazine. He enjoys spending his spare time with his sons Christian, 14, and Dominic, 10; they’re currently trying to learn how to play golf. “In my case,” Grose says, “the emphasis is on the verb ‘trying.’”

 

Stephen RountreeVirginia-based artist and journalist Stephen Rountree created the cover illustration and opener for “Trouble on the Horizon.” He specializes in illustrating technical subjects. His work appears in Popular Science, Smithsonian and U.S. News & World Report magazines, among other publications. Had he not almost failed algebra, he might very well have become an engineer himself.

 

Sarah WilkinsSarah Wilkins illustrated the opener for the story “Get Smart.” Born and educated in New Zealand, she began her career as an illustrator in Australia, before spending seven years in Paris. In 2000, Sarah returned to New Zealand after a 15-year absence, where she continues working for clients in France and the United States.

 

 

 

 


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American Society for Engineering Education