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ASEE PRISM
  American Society for Engineering Education
American Society for Engineering EducationJANUARY 2008Volume 17 | Number 5 PRISM HOMETABLE OF CONTENTSBACK ISSUES
FEATURES
COVER STORY: Game of Chance - TO STAY COMPETITIVE, AMERICA NEEDS A LEADER COMMITTED TO MAKING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY A PRIORITY, EDUCATORS SAY. BUT NONE OF THE 2008 CANDIDATES OFFERS A SURE BET.  - BY JEFFREY SELINGO- BY JEFFREY SELINGO
FEATURE: Extreme Learning - CAR BOMBS, TSUNAMI SHELTERS, SPACE ROBOTS—UNIVERSITY LABS ARE MAKING THE STUDY OF ENGINEERING EVER MORE REAL. WHO WOULDN’T GET DRAWN IN WITH HANDS-ON PROJECTS LIKE THESE?   - BY MARY LORD
FEATURE: Too Little Respect - BRITISH ENGINEERS, ONCE THE PRIDE OF AN EMPIRE, ARE TYPECAST BY THE PUBLIC AND RARELY REACH THE EXECUTIVE SUITE. EDUCATORS EXPLORE CURRICULUM CHANGES TO GIVE THE PROFESSION A BOOST.   - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

DEPARTMENTS
COMMENTS
BRIEFINGS
DATABYTES
REFRACTIONS: Changing Study Habits - BY HENRY PETROSKI
CLASSIFIEDS
INTERACTIVE SKILLS: An Engineering Necessity – BY DR. LEE HARRISBERGER
LAST WORD: A Friend, Indeed - BY JAY BANERJEE

TEACHING TOOLBOX
TEACHING TOOLBOX: Fast and Curious - OFFER STUDENTS THE CHANCE TO WORK ON DESIGN WITH A LEGENDARY SPORTS CAR MAKER, AND THEY’LL SIGN UP—A GRAN VELOCITÀ.  - BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS
TEACHING TOOLBOX: ON THE SHELF: Terrible Twins - BY ROBIN TATU
TEACHING TOOLBOX: JEE SELECTS: It’s About More Than Numbers - BY MAURA BORREGO


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Testing Explosives

Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center,
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

Building car bombs and examining scorched sedans. Shooting supermarket chickens at helicopter windshields to calculate winged hazards. “Field work” takes on a whole new meaning at New Mexico Tech’s Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC), the nation’s leading lab for studying explosives—from tiny air-bag charges to 50,000-pound blasts.

Testing Explosives: 1 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 2 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 3 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 4 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 5 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 6 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 7 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 8 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
Testing Explosives: 9 of 9
Courtesy New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology/Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center
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Simulated Natural Disaster

Tsunami Wave Basin, O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory, Oregon State University College of Engineering

The slight bulge of water rolling toward Seaside, Ore., hardly looked menacing. But its destructive power became viscerally clear to the students and researchers who built this scale-model simulation when a towering tsunami slammed into the beachfront promenade. “I’ve never had a project that people reacted to like this one,” says Daniel Cox, associate professor of civil and construction engineering and director of the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University’s College of Engineering in Corvallis. “They really can identify with it.”

Scale-Model Tsunami Simulation: 1 of 5
Courtesy Oregon State University College of Engineering
Scale-Model Tsunami Simulation: 2 of 5
Courtesy Oregon State University College of Engineering
Scale-Model Tsunami Simulation: 3 of 5
Courtesy Oregon State University College of Engineering
Scale-Model Tsunami Simulation: 4 of 5
Courtesy Oregon State University College of Engineering
Scale-Model Tsunami Simulation: 5 of 5
Courtesy Oregon State University College of Engineering
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Underwater with Robots

Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility, A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland

Limbs float weightlessly. Nothing rises or falls. Plunging into the giant swimming pool known as the Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility (NBRF) at the University of Maryland’s A. James Clark School of Engineering, says its director, David Akin, “is the closest you can get to being an astronaut without having to live in Houston.”

Underwater with Robots: 1 of 4
Courtesy A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland
Underwater with Robots: 2 of 4
A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland
Underwater with Robots: 3 of 4
A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland
Underwater with Robots: 4 of 4
A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland
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American Society for Engineering Education