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ASEE PRISM
  American Society for Engineering Education
American Society for Engineering EducationJANUARY 2007Volume 16 | Number 5 PRISM HOMETABLE OF CONTENTSBACK ISSUES
FEATURES
21st Century Prof. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE
Counting on Them - BY THOMAS K. GROSE
A Man of Vision - BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

DEPARTMENTS
COMMENTS
E-MAIL
BRIEFINGS
DATABYTES
REFRACTIONS: Making Changes - BY HENRY PETROSKI
CLASSIFIEDS
LAST WORD: Lessons From the Sandbox - BY JACQUELYN F. SULLIVAN

TEACHING TOOLBOX
Monsters on the Move - A slew of schools are preparing students to work in the computer game industry. - BY CORINNA WU
BOOK REVIEW: Power, Speed, and Form: Engineers and the Making of the Twentieth Century - REVIEWED BY ROBIN TATU
YEAR OF DIALOGUE: Getting the Word Out - BY LARRY G. RICHARDS
ON CAMPUS: A Living Laboratory - BY LYNNE SHALLCROSS


BACK ISSUES







 
The New Engineering Professor Frank L. Huband
 


This month’s cover story looks at the tough world inhabited by pre-tenure faculty members. In the good old days, newly hired engineering professors could take a couple of years to figure out where they were headed before being expected to raise research money. Times have changed though, and today’s young academics are expected to hit the deck running in pursuit of major grant money or risk not getting tenure. On top of competing for the ever more competitive government research dollars, many professors feel the expectation to be superstars in the classroom while also pitching in to help efforts to attract high school students, minorities and women. Those we contacted for the story spoke of the heavy demands placed on today’s young academics, but still agreed that “it’s a great job.”

Apparently David Wormley, dean of engineering at Penn State and president of ASEE, would concur. Wormley thought he’d be a mechanical engineer like his father and end up in industry. Instead, he developed a love of teaching while gaining his Ph.D. at MIT, and in 1992, he joined Penn State as dean of engineering. In “A Man of Vision,” Wormley discusses his work at Penn State, characterizing it as multifaceted, challenging and rewarding. He observes that international experience is becoming more important all the time and predicts “…in the future our engineers will not only be competing with graduates from China and India and Europe but cooperating with them as well.” As ASEE president, Wormley wants to expand ASEE’s activities to communicate and collaborate with colleagues worldwide.

In November, the United States had its midterm elections, and 55 million people cast ballots in those elections using some form of computerized machine. Some anxious computer experts held a collective breath and hoped for the best. In “Counting on Them,” we get good news and bad news. There were no major meltdowns—despite a variety of glitches nationwide. That’s the good news. The bad is that some computer scientists and critics of computer voting say that voting machines remain fraught with risk. Nevertheless, it appears that computerized voting is here to stay, and computer engineers have ideas on how to make the systems and results more secure.

As always, I would welcome your thoughts on our stories and any suggestions you may care to share.

Frank L. Huband
Executive Director and Publisher
f.huband@asee.org

 

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American Society for Engineering Education