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PRISM - American Society for Engineering Education - 2006 Annual conference - June 18-21 FEBRUARY 2006 - VOLUME 15, NUMBER 6 - SPECIAL ISSUE: 2006 Annual conference
conference features
WORKSHOPS

The following workshops will take place during the 2006 ASEE Annual Conference. Due to limited seating, you MUST register for all workshops. Please note: Only those registered for the ASEE Annual Conference are eligible to purchase tickets to workshops.


0213 - Integrating Engineering Data Analysis and Experimentation
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
$60.00
Chemical Engineering

Engineering data analysis and experimental design are essential tools in the engineer’s toolbox of problem-solving techniques. Engineering curricula often lack the flexibility to include separate required courses in this area. Integration of data analysis and experimental design techniques throughout the curriculum addresses this problem and offers the advantage of repetition as well as direct application.

This workshop reviews some of the most important data analysis and experimental design techniques for engineering applications. Examples of how to integrate these techniques into existing classes and laboratories through demonstrations, classroom activities and laboratory activities are included. The workshop focuses on experimental design and data analysis as a tool for engineering problem solving. Techniques for integrating software packages into teaching and laboratories are also discussed. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop computer to the workshop.

Workshop leaders: Zenaida Otero Gephardt, Ph.D., P.E. (Rowan University, Glassboro, N.J.) and S. Scott Moor, Ph.D. (Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, Ind.)


0220 - Real-Time DSP for Educators
8:30 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.
$250.00
Computers in Education

This hands-on workshop will provide participants with a comprehensive introduction to real-time Digital Signal Processing, with an emphasis on how to incorporate these topics into their own courses. Because getting started with industry standard chips is a formidable task for most faculty, the morning session will focus on hardware and software installation and testing. The afternoon will focus on projects for various courses. Participants will take home a TI C6713 DSK with CCS software suite, a host port interface daughter board, a copy of the winDSK6 software, all class notes and software and a copy of a real-time DSP textbook.


0225 - An Integrated Hands-On Freshman Experience
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
$45.00
Design in Engineering Education

The workshop is presented to faculty interested in providing a hands-on freshman experience that is strongly linked to an integrated professional component plan (design, communication, professional tools and ethics) across the entire curriculum. In the actual course, students experience the struggles of the design-build-test process through the design, fabrication and assembly of a Wobbler oscillating steam engine. Workshop participants will build and take home a functioning steam engine (no machining required) and develop explicit techniques for executing and assessing the professional component. A descriptive course folder with curricular details and engine design plans and guidelines will be provided. The workshop is offered by mechanical engineering faculty members from Western Kentucky University.


0230 - Building Capacity for Engineering Education Research
8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods

Building on the conference theme of Advancing the Scholarship of Engineering Education, this workshop seeks to engage participants in identifying the knowledge areas, skill sets and resources required for the appropriate conduct, communication and review of engineering education research. In this session participants will work collectively to a) review the research themes and questions identified in the Engineering Education Research Colloquy series, b) develop strategies for building capacity for engineering education research within current and future faculty, c) suggest activities that can be taken by academic institutions, professional societies and other groups to facilitate rigorous engineering education research and d) recommend desired actions by federal and state policymakers in support of engineering education research.

Facilitators: Robin Adams (Purdue University), Norman Fortenberry (National Academy of Engineering), Karl Smith (University of Minnesota) and Ruth Streveler (Colorado School of Mines)


0231 - Content Matters: Designing an Inclusive Syllabus in STEM Courses
8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods, Women in Engineering

Building an inclusive classroom climate begins with designing your syllabus. Participants in this workshop will examine ways to assess current course content, identify strategic enrichments, locate and translate appropriate material, respond to students’ reactions and evaluate impact. Syllabi will be peer reviewed to identify strengths and opportunities, and participants will learn about a three-semester study to develop, deliver and then assess the impact of diversity enrichments in an ecology course. Examples of specific lecture content before and after the study will be shared, as will students’ assessments of the classroom climate and an analysis of the evidence for change as a result of the enrichments. Finally, facilitators will describe a revision process and share next steps.

Facilitators: Barbara Bogue (Pennsylvania State University), Sandra Courter (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Hatice Orun Ozturk (North Carolina State University) and Mary Wyer (North Carolina State University)



0234 - Putting Power Into Your Class Lecture With PowerPoint
8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods, Physics and Engineering Physics

This workshop will allow participants to study and apply the pedagogical applications of PowerPoint in order to understand its proper use in the classroom. These applications include dynamic content, cognitive enhancement, external learning and integration of materials. Workshop participants will leave with an understanding of best practices for the software and for pedagogy when using the software. Participants who bring a laptop with PowerPoint (preferably XP or later versions) will work with other participants to create a lecture based on the applications presented. In the process, workshop participants will learn how to produce animations, hyperlinked tables of content, video and audio and will develop other technical skills.

Facilitator: Michael DeAntonio (New Mexico State University)


0235 - Writing Proposals to Meet NSF’s Expectations
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods

The workshop will encompass three related but separate themes relevant to writing effective educational proposals. The three themes will be treated in independent sessions, and participants may attend any or all of the interactive sessions by purchasing a single ticket. Session A will focus on writing effective proposals, and it will enable participants to identify and use strategies for improving their proposals. Session B will consider project evaluation plans, and it will enable participants to work with an evaluator to collaboratively develop and implement an evaluation plan. Session C will concentrate NSF’s broader-impacts review criterion, and it will enable participants to understand the criterion and enhance broader impacts in a proposal.

Facilitators: Barb Anderegg, Susan Burkett, Connie Della-Piana, Sue Kemnitzer, Russ Pimmel and Bevlee Watford (National Science Foundation)


0247 - What Do Our Students Really Know? A Workshop in Informed Design & Action Research
8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Free
Engineering Technology Division

This workshop, facilitated by educators from the NSF-funded New York State Professional Development Collaborative, will introduce two-person teams of high school and college technology educators to classroom research methodologies. Participants will learn how to conduct action research in the context of an engineering design challenge—designing a food dehydrator. This educational research will be focused on the question, “Are my students truly learning/understanding the mathematical and scientific concepts that will help them be savvy engineering/technology problem solvers?”

Participants will receive up to $1,000 per person to help cover travel, lodging and/or registration for the ASEE conference.

Teams (comprised of one high school technology teacher and one college faculty member) must submit a single workshop application (available on NYSPDC’s Web site, www.hofstra.edu/nyspdc). Selection of participating teams will be based on application responses. For further information, contact Peggie Weeks, NYSPDC project director, at peggie.weeks@adelphia.net or (607) 292-6116.


0275 - Teacher Talks for New Faculty
8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
$35.00
New Engineering Educators

This guided discussion workshop will be interspersed with short presentations and discussions on topics of interest. The workshop will begin with short presentations on fundamental teaching and learning skills that lead to organized and interactive classrooms to set the tone for further discussions. Attendees will then be asked to list several topics of interest; the group will then select topics for small working-group discussion using a storyboard technique. The small working-group guided discussions will be presented to the workshop class; a mapping technique will be used to record discussions for distribution to the participants. The workshop will culminate with a free discussion period on relevant issues. The use of the guided discussion models is a student-centered teaching technique that calls upon student insight to keep the process moving.

Come to learn, contribute to your peer group, network and engage in open
Teacher Talks!


0288 - Hands-On Activities for Technological Literacy
8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
$40.00
Technological Literacy Constituent Committee

Learning how favorite consumer products work can be an effective theme in technological literacy courses for nonengineering students, first-year engineering programs for neophyte engineers and even disciplinary engineering courses for advanced undergraduates. In this workshop, participants will carry out hands-on activities, involving device dissection and device de novo construction, aimed at learning how things work. Workshop activities include taking apart a portable CD player to identify key components and observe the two-tiered control system for laser positioning and focus. Participants will also build from simple components an electrodynamic loudspeaker that can produce clear and loud sound. Other classroom-tested mechanical dissection and simple construction projects will also be explained and demonstrated. Workshop participants will learn strategies and techniques for successful implementation of hands-on “how things work” activities.


0292 - Preventing Marginalization of Underrepresented Students on Teams
8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
$50.00
Women in Engineering

Great engineering project teams encourage members to attempt tasks outside their academic comfort zone and support members in succeeding. Sadly, students who participate in contentious teams often fail to learn project material and take away a negative view of both the team experience and the field of engineering. Project teams are a fixture in engineering education. Faculty members must be able to identify problematic team interactions and mitigate their impact. This is especially critical when teams include members of underrepresented student populations in engineering. These groups include women, African Americans, Latinos/Latinas and Native Americans. Members of these groups may already be challenged by a lack of similar others among peers and faculty. This workshop will present a panel of engineering faculty and program specialists who will present best practices on preventing marginalization. The workshop will be an interactive experience with a lively and engaged group of attendees.


0336 - Undergraduate Associate Deans Forum
10:30 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.
$35.00
Engineering Deans Council

This forum is intended for assistant/associate deans with responsibilities for undergraduate education. Presentations and topics of mutual interest to undergraduate deans will be solicited by mid-March, and the most popular and relevant topics will be placed on the program. This will be moderated by Thomas Wolff of Michigan State University. Please bring your own lunch.



0345 - Support Mechanisms for Engineering Research in NIH
10:30 a.m. - Noon
$35.00
Engineering Research Council

This workshop will discuss “Support Mechanisms for Engineering Research in NIH.”


0360 - Develop Computer-Based Active-Learning Engineering Course Materials and Delivery Online Globally
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
$25.00
International, Computers in Education

This hands-on workshop is intended for engineering educators interested in developing, delivering (online) and assessing computer-based and Web-based active learning resources of their courses. Workshop topics will include discussion of hardware and software used in developing teaching materials and techniques used to create the materials. Assessment methods used will be discussed. Participants will receive a CD with the information. Workshop was developed as part of grants from NSF (CCLI-0088947), Hewlett Foundation (University of Wyoming) and Texas Tech University.


0361 - Managing the Paper Load
10:30 a.m. - Noon
$35.00
Liberal Education

Engineering Educators sometimes wish to include effective writing assignments but may hesitate to add to an already heavy load. Professors have little time, especially when teaching new courses, for added duties, particularly grading. In addition, some engineering professors may feel unequipped to evaluate writing. This workshop, co-facilitated by three veteran writing professors, presents techniques for evaluating writing more effectively and efficiently. The following topics will be covered: holistic grading, grading with rubrics and un-grading (adding learning intensive writing assignments without extra grading). Participants are encouraged to bring a course syllabus and a list of current writing assignments. This workshop will be led by Julie Sharp (Purdue), Marilyn Dyrud (Oregon Institute of Technology) and Barbara Olds (NSF and Colorado School of Mines).


0409 - Problem-Based Learning
12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
$30.00
Biomedical Engineering

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach that is uniquely suited to engineering education. It has been adopted in both undergraduate and graduate curriculums by a growing number of engineering departments throughout the world. Unlike conventional teaching, PBL starts with a problem and requires the students, working in teams under the guidance of a tutor/facilitator, to research, select, analyze and apply information and theories to solve the problem. Through tackling complex open-ended problems, students can develop the analytical thinking and problem solving that set engineers apart from other professional problem solvers. PBL prepares students to participate in research laboratories as undergraduates and readies them for graduate school and for time-constrained problem solving in the real world. This educational approach is well-suited to the demands of a rapidly changing field that needs experts who can change and grow through life-long learning. The goal of this workshop is to demonstrate how PBL can be used effectively in an engineering curriculum. Participants will learn the role of the tutor/facilitator, the art of developing PBL problems and how to assess student learning in PBL settings.


0413 - Integrating CFD Into the Undergraduate Curriculum
12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Free
Chemical Engineering

This workshop will disseminate the results of two NSF-funded projects that involved integration of CFD into the undergraduate engineering curriculum. The CFD educational software code, FlowLab, was modified during the course of both NSF-funded projects in order to enhance its effectiveness in improving students’ understanding of basic CFD concepts and basic concepts in transport phenomena. The workshop will include training in the use of the modified Flowlab CFD software and sharing of course resources including sample syllabi, CFD homework problems with solutions, introductory CFD lecture material and assessment strategies and tests for evaluating knowledge of CFD and the effectiveness of CFD to enhance understanding of transport phenomena.

Participants must provide their own laptop computer to use during the workshop and add a workshop ticket to their conference registration by May 15, 2006 in order to attend.

Workshop leaders:
Fred Stern and Tao Xing,
University of Iowa

Jennifer Sinclair Curtis,
University of Florida

Rodney Fox,
Iowa State University

Shane Moeykens,
Fluent, Inc.


0415 - Incorporating Standards Into Capstone Design Courses
12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
$30.00
Civil Engineering

Students entering the workforce must have a minimum standards literacy. The ABET criteria for engineering programs require that engineering standards be an aspect of the culminating major design experience. Programs in engineering technology must also include capstone or other integrating experiences. Though consideration of standards is not required, it is appropriate in the development of a product, process and/or service.
In this workshop, panelists from academia, industry and standards-developing organizations will provide insight into the world of voluntary standards and techniques for incorporating standards and conformity assessment-related topics in engineering curricula. Examples of current standardization issues—such as sustainable development; manufacturing and design issues; health and safety requirements; economic, social and political considerations—will be highlighted and discussed from the perspective of design. Educators can expect to gain a better understanding of the importance of standards and some examples of how to incorporate standards materials into their curriculum.


0420 - Effective Practices in Robotics Education
12:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
$75.00
Computers in Education

This hands-on workshop is aimed at engineering faculty members who have an interest in interdisciplinary team-based design, robotics and computer applications. This workshop will be led by engineers experienced in integrating robots into the curriculum, from first-year courses through senior design projects.


0430 - Conducting Peer Evaluations Using the Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness
12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods

A multi-university research team has designed a peer evaluation instrument that is simple to use. Student opinions are collected through a Web interface, ensuring the confidentiality of the peer ratings, and the system analyzes the data to calculate suggested grade adjustments for equitably distributing a team’s grade among the team’s members. The system also provides extensive feedback to faculty regarding certain dynamics of student teams that can be discerned from the peer evaluation data. Reliability and validity studies are underway. Participants will be guided in using the system and will have an opportunity to discuss and shape the feedback the system provides. Participants should bring a laptop computer that has wireless network capability (and preferably with battery operation) to the workshop.

Facilitators: Lisa Bullard (North Carolina State University), Cynthia Finelli (University of Michigan), Richard Layton (Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology), Misty Loughry (Clemson University), Matthew Ohland (Clemson University) and other members of this research team.


0431 - Quantitative Research Methodology
12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods

This workshop is designed to help researchers and graduate students learn about the main elements of quantitative research methodology in educational research and other research settings. The workshop will discuss research problems/questions, research variables, research designs and approaches, data collection and analysis and the interpretation and reporting of research findings. The workshop will also analyze application cases along with real-world examples.

Facilitator: Shi “Stan” Lan (DeVry University, Chicago Campus)


0434 - Tablet PCs in Engineering Education
12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods

Tablet PCs are one of the newest innovations in the computing and communications world. These devices consist of a standard notebook PC configured with a screen that acts as both a display device and an input device. A stylus can be used to input standard mouse-type commands as well as gesture commands and electronic ink drawings. In this workshop, faculty will receive a hands-on introduction to Classroom Presenter and OneNote along with other software related to teaching/learning. Facilitators will provide sufficient instruction for faculty to be competent at using these tools to make tablet PC-based classroom presentations that include rich interaction with students in the class. Facilitators will present various pedagogical practices that they have found effective in using these technology tools in the classroom, including active learning exercises for various engineering and science disciplines.

Facilitators: Joe Tront, Virginia Tech, and Jane Prey, Microsoft


0440 - Ethics Integration in the Engineering Curriculum
12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
$50.00
Engineering Ethics Constituent Committee

A variety of approaches to the integration of ethics throughout the engineering curriculum will be presented by a panel of engineering educators. Each panelist will present practical steps taken toward integration. Following all the presentations, there will be an open forum for audience interaction with the panelists. The event promises to be filled with practical advice on best practices.

For $75, you can attend both workshops sponsored by the Engineering Ethics Constituent Committee (0440 & 0540). For more information, see the workshop information on the Web.


0461 - Clear and Concise: Using Communications Rubrics
12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
$35.00
Liberal Education

The purpose of this workshop is to provide engineering faculty with the opportunity to develop rubrics for the assessment of students’ written communication. A rubric is a standard by which something like writing is measured. Rubrics speed up the evaluation process because they make explicit to students the standards by which their writing will be measured. Rubrics also permit faculty members to clarify their own ideas about what they are looking for in students’ writing. Participants in this workshop will engage in a series of rubric-development exercises defining what we mean by clear and concise writing, making our definitions explicit to students and using rubrics we have developed to assess writing. Samples of successful rubrics will be provided, and participants will also be assisted in developing rubrics that are specific to their assignments and courses. Workshop presenters are Julia Williams, Anneliese Watt and Richard House from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.


0525 - Teaching Design for “New” Faculty
2:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
$35.00
Design in Engineering Education

This workshop will outline the planning, execution and assessment of typical engineering design courses such as Introduction to Design, Sophomore Design and Capstone Design. Example syllabi, homework, project assignments and grading will be presented and discussed. New faculty members, or faculty members new to teaching design, are encouraged to attend.


0530 - Guiding Future Faculty to Develop an Effective Teaching Philosophy
3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods; New Engineering Educators

A teaching philosophy is vital for conveying one’s beliefs about teaching and learning while engaging educators in the reflective process of critically analyzing and articulating their beliefs. In this highly interactive workshop, current and future faculty members will begin to generate their own teaching philosophy and discuss it with others. Facilitators will share the challenges of coaching the teaching philosophy development process as well as successful strategies. Participants will discuss potential implementation of this professional development workshop at other educational institutions. This workshop is geared toward organizational change agents, instructors, faculty, future faculty and future faculty developers; all disciplines and institution types are welcome.

Facilitators: Sandra Courter, Christine Pfund and Jen Schoepke (University of Wisconsin-Madison)


0531 - Making the Transition to Problem-Based Learning
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
$25.00
Educational Research & Methods

This is a hands-on workshop for faculty who want to incorporate Problem-Based Learning (PBL) into their classes, with an emphasis on how to make the transition from a traditional lecture-based format to this active, student-centered environment. The facilitators have successfully incorporated PBL and other active learning techniques into their classes as part of a multiyear, NSF-funded initiative. They will briefly review the motivation to move to PBL from the traditional environment and share experiences of what has worked and what has not worked in the classroom. Participants will have the opportunity to develop materials for their own classes during the workshop and will leave with problem-based learning resources to continue this work back at their home institutions.

Facilitators: Michael Prince and Margot Vigeant (Bucknell University)


0540 - Teaching and Assessing Ethics in Engineering
2:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
$50.00
Engineering Ethics Constituent Committee

Many engineering faculty have difficulty knowing how or when to insert ethics and how to measure the effects when they do. Yet this is an important part of professional preparation. This workshop will provide practical experience in the identification and creation of learning outcomes related to ethics, teaching strategies to be used and appropriate assessment techniques. The presenters will demonstrate that ethics can be approached on several levels, somewhat related to Bloom’s taxonomy of learning objectives (Bloom, 1956). For example, students can be taught to recall information, apply ethical principles in a given situation or evaluate a situation, extract the required information and provide appropriate rationale for their decisions. All of these approaches are acceptable for accreditation purposes; when you complete this workshop, you will have tools and knowledge that will help you focus your efforts toward improving and assessing ethics in your engineering program.

Presenters:
John C. Wise
Director, Engineering Instructional Services
The Pennsylvania State University

Thomas A. Litzinger
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education
The Pennsylvania State University

For $75, you can attend both workshops sponsored by the Engineering Ethics Constituent Committee (0440 & 0540). For more information, see the workshop information on the Web.


0545 - Writing Successful Proposals to the NSF
2:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
$35.00
Engineering Research Council

NSF officials provide information and helpful insight into the successful solicitation of research funding through competitive proposals.


0560 - Engineering Cultures: First Step Toward Global Competence
2:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
$50.00
International

Globalization challenges engineers to prepare for work in culturally diverse environments where they encounter other engineers and coworkers who define and solve problems differently than they do. Engineering Cultures® multimedia modules are designed to help students take the critical first step toward the achievement of global competence. This workshop presents the organizing concepts in Engineering Cultures®, demonstrates the multimedia modules and engages participants in exercises to learn about how different national traditions position engineers and their knowledge. Goals of the workshop are 1) to facilitate greater cross-cultural understanding by helping participants (and their students) better understand, analyze and appreciate the value of perspectives other than their own and 2) to help participants assess how they might be able to integrate Engineering Cultures® modules into their education programs. Instructors are the authors of the modules, Gary Downey of Virginia Tech and Juan Lucena of the Colorado School of Mines.


For the most current program please visit www.asee.org/annual2006



 

CONFERENCE FEATURES
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Conference at a Glance
Conference Highlights
TECHNICAL PROGRAM INFORMATION
WORKSHOPS
PROFESSIONAL AND FAMILY TOURS
EXPOSITION
EXHIBIT HALL FLOOR PLAN (PDF: 370KB)
SPONSORSHIP
TICKETED SESSIONS
REGISTRATION INFORMATION
CHICAGO MAP (PDF:2,488KB)
GENERAL/HOUSING INFORMATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS/CONFERENCE STAFF
SESSION CODE GUIDE
HOTEL & CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORMS
2006 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition - June 18-21, 2006 - Chicago
SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE: February 2006 - A CHALLENGING MATCHUP - Time-consuming wrangling with industry over intellectual property issues are making negotiations more difficult.
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