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March + April 2013

March + April 2013

  • Cover Story: Mind-Boggling
    Can scientists and engineers map all 1,000 trillion connections in the brain?
    It won’t happen fast, but advanced equipment is yielding impressive results.
    + BY Mary Lord


  • of mice & men
    Yes, engineers experiment on animals, but they also develop promising alternative research methods.
    + BY jaimie n. Schock

  • strange labfellows
    Once worlds apart, engineering educators and social scientists now collaborate — to make better engineers.
    + BY art pine

 

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February 2013

February 2013

  • Cover Story: Urban Outfitters
    How engineers hope to transform congested cities into sustainable
    homes for half of humanity.
    + BY THOMAS K. GROSE


  • Home Sweet Utopia
    South Korea’s “ubiquitous cities” aim to improve life with alert – if all-too-knowing – smart buildings.
    + BY LUCILLE CRAFT

  • TEACHING: Labs on a Shoestring
    From donated industrial equipment to homemade parts and student-purchased kits, schools get creative in providing active-learning experiences.
    + BY MARY LORD

 

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January 2013

January 2013

 

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December 2012

December 2012

  • Cover Story: Delivering Big Data
    How computer scientists convert information overload into valuable, even lifesaving knowledge.
    + By Thomas K. Grose


  • Einsteins on the Beach
    Japan looks to a remote institute for a technological reboot.
    + By Lucille Craft

  • TEACHING: WOW the Audience
    Many engineering students lack the communications skills they will need to succeed professionally. Here’s how educators are working to fix that.
    + By Thomas K. Grose

 

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November 2012

November 2012

  • Cover Story: Dance With the Dragon
    Research partnerships grow alongside U.S.-Chinese competition.
    + By Mark Matthews


  • Grave New World
    Emerging technologies with the power to harm or help pose tough ethical choices – and a challenge for educators.
    + By Art Pine

  • Light Fantastic
    The potential of photonics and optics is just starting to be tapped.
    + Thomas K. Grose

 

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October 2012

October 2012

  • Cover Story: BOLD EXPERIMENT
    Universities face new competition as elite schools offer course certificates to the online masses.
    + By Beryl Lieff Benderly


  • SILICON SPOOKS
    How the CIA turned venture capitalism into a high-tech intelligence tool.
    + By Art Pine

  • MIRACLE MATERIAL
    Conductive and flexible yet harder than a diamond, graphene could revolutionize industries from electronics to aeronautics.
    + Thomas K. Grose

 

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September 2012

September 2012

  • Cover Story: Dream Factory
    University engineers are often the hidden stars behind on-screen excitement.
    + BY Alison Buki & THOMAS K. GROSE


  • Lives of an Engineer
    For Walter Buchanan, IBM mainframes, the Saturn V rocket, Navy service, and the law were just a prelude to the “constant stimulation” of teaching.
    + By Pierre Home-Douglas

  • Ideas Worth Sharing
    A multiuniversity collaboration yields lasting improvements in engineering education.
    + By Margaret Loftus

 

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Summer 2012

Summer 2012

  • Cover Story: Steeper Ascent
    Should a master’s be the minimum for engineers?
    PLUS: Britain’s shorter route —could it work here?
    + By Thomas K. Grose

  • OUTSIDE CHANCE
    Few opportunities exist for aspiring engineers inside U.S. prison walls.
    New Zealand inmates see a brighter future.
    + By Jaimie N. Schock

  • Fashion, Form, and Function
    A photo essay explores advances in textiles.
    + By prism staff

 

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April 2012

April 2012

  • Cover Story: Engines of Exploration
    Putting the BIG in Big Science
    + By Thomas K. Grose

  • Dissecting Disaster
    After the Fukushima nuclear meltdown, as in past accidents, Japan turned to mechanical engineer Yotaro Hatamura to unravel a chain of mistakes.
    + By Lucille Craft

  • Brighter Outlook
    Community colleges find that faculty-student research projects help spot and develop STEM talent.
    + By Margaret Loftus

 

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March 2012

March 2012

  • Cover Story: Heavy Industry
    Can Canada enjoy both an oil-sands boom and a clean environment? At the University of Alberta, more than 1,000 researchers are trying to find out.
    + By Pierre Home-Douglas

  • Great Expectations
    Freeman Hrabowski knows how students can succeed in STEM – and makes sure they do.
    + By Kathryn Masterson

  • A Way with Waste
    The Gates Foundation’s Reinvent the Toilet challenge inspires no-plumbing solutions that turn human effluent into useful products.
    + By Don Boroughs

 

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February 2012: SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE

February 2012

  • Cover Story: field of dreams
    Upstart undergraduate inventors are learning to navigate the marketplace — often with university help.
    + By Alison Buki

  • The 10,000 Challenge
    Can engineering schools answer the White House call for more engineers? Should they try? It depends on whom you ask.
    + thomas k. grose

  • SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE:
    Information about ASEE's 2012 ANNUAL CONFERENCE & Exposition - June 10–13, 2012 | San Antonio, Texas

 

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January 2012

January 2012

  • Cover Story: A Deeper Partnership
    Forget science fairs and drop-bys. Engineering educators now actively prepare teachers to deliver the E in K-12 STEM.
    + By Mary Lord

  • Staying Number One
    How can U.S. research universities remain the world’s best?
    + By Beryl Lieff Benderly

  • Primary Colors
    GOP contest paints a blurry picture on science and R&D.
    + By ART PINE

 

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December 2011

December 2011

 

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November 2011

November 2011

  • Cover Story: MAKING IT
    Revolutionary manufacturing processes stir hope of a U.S. industrial revival.
    + BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • little boxes take off
    Nanosatellites bring space discovery to campus at down-to-earth prices.
    + By Charles Q. Choi

  • POWERING ON
    South Korea bets the time is right for a nuclear-only graduate school.
    + By Corinna Wu

 

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October 2011

October 2011

  • Cover Story: AFRICAN PHOENIX
    Rwanda rises from horror to train engineers for a knowledge-based economy.
    Zimbabwe’s Descent
    Education collapsed with the economy.
    + By Don Boroughs

  • Deadly Ingredients
    E. coli and other food-borne diseases kill thousands annually. Researchers in the emerging field of food-safety engineering are trying to protect what we eat, from farm to table.
    + By Beryl Lieff Benderly

  • Secrets Are Out
    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender engineers are no longer willing to hide their true selves.
    + By Jaimie N. Schock

 

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September 2011

September 2011

  • Cover Story: SEEING AND DOING
    Revamped curricula show freshmen what it means to be an engineer.
    + BY MARY LORD

  • GET FRACKING
    Engineers stoke the shale gas boom – and investigate its risks.
    + BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • CREATING BUZZ
    Don Giddens wants ASEE to be a key player in engineering.
    + BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

 

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Summer 2011

Summer 2011

 

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March + April 2011

March + April 2011

  • Cover Story: THE INTERDISCIPLINARIAN
    NSF's director wants to tear down barriers to research collaboration.
    + BY BOYCE RENSBERGER

  • MOORE OR LESS?
    An Intel cofounder observed that advances in computer chips double their performance roughly every two years. Now, researchers are struggling to prove this "law" still holds.
    + BY KEVIN LEWIS

  • Whet Their Appetite
    Down-to-earth illustrations – like an exploding sausage – are among techniques shown to stimulate learning and student retention.
    + By MARGARET LOFTUS

 

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February 2011: SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE

February 2011

 

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January 2011

January 2011

 

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December 2010

December 2010

  • Cover Story: UNDER ATTACK
    Software engineers range widely across disciplines to unmask and defeat cyberfoes. But can they win?
    BY DAVID ZAX

  • LEARNING FROM DISASTER
    The Gulf oil spill holds powerful lessons for future engineers.
    BY CHARLES Q. CHOI

  • A WINNING COMBINATION
    EPICS draws high school students to engineering through community service.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

 

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November 2010

November 2010

  • Cover Story: PERIL IN SMALL PLACES
    Engineers join the quest to identify and prevent potential hazards in nanotechnology products.
    BY CORINNA WU

  • HERITAGE AND HOPE
    Native American colleges draw science learning back to cultural roots.
    BY MARY LORD

  • CODE RED RESEARCH
    Universities' homeland security centers provide innovation on demand.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

 

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October 2010

October 2010

  • Cover Story: Extra Strength
    Engineering offers new insights into diseases and tools to treat them.
    BY BERYL LIEFF BENDERLY

  • Energy & Empathy
    ASEE's president combines an innate drive and a desire to understand today's students.
    BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

  • Bowled Over
    Britain's austerity budget rolls straight toward science and engineering
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

 

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September 2010

September 2010

  • CATALYST
    The industry-university partnership is this year’s hot economic-development strategy. But not all “innovation clusters” prove to be winners.
    BY DON BOROUGHS

  • IT TAKES A COMMUNITY
    Role models, peers, and parents are key to a program drawing underserved students into STEM.
    BY MARGARET LOFTUS

  • HYPE OR HOPE?
    A once favored alternative fuel is shunted to the slow lane.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

 

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Summer 2010

Summer 2010

  • HAMMER, BRUSH, & SICKLE
    Pulling back the curtain on North Korean engineering.
    By MARK MATTHEWS & GEOFFREY CAIN


  • IN THEIR GRASP
    Students with disabilities seldom pursue engineering or science careers. But that may be about to change.
    BY MARGARET LOFTUS

  • SHAPE SHIFTERS
    When architects and engineers think outside the rectangular box, the results are striking. Add gleaming surfaces of glass, steel, and aluminum, and see the line between structure and sculpture disappear.

 

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April 2010

www.prism-magazine.org/apr10 »
April 2010
  • 'BYE THE BOOK
    In educational publishing, the only certainty is change.
    BY DON BOROUGHS


  • LAUREATE AND REBEL
    Nobel physicist Carl Wieman wants to reform science teaching. The White House is listening.
    BY DAVID ZAX

  • THEIR FUTURE IS GREEN
    The clean-energy economy promises an engineering jobs bounty. Will universities produce enough graduates with the right skills?
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

 

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March 2010

www.prism-magazine.org/mar10 »
March 2010
  • LEAPING THE BARRIER
    It's tough attracting start-up capital in an economic downturn. Here's how some university researchers cope with the challenge.
    BY DON BOROUGHS


  • MANY VISIONS
    Backed by big federal grants, farflung laboratory networks explore the horizons of energy science.
    BY CHARLES Q. CHOI

  • A SHARPER EDGE
    Staking its future on innovation, Singapore seeks to train more - and better - engineers.
    BY CORINNA WU

 

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February 2010: SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE

www.prism-magazine.org/feb10 »

February 2010

  • DAY OF RECKONING
    California’s money woes ignite student anger and force tough choices at the state's flagship engineering school.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE


  • CHOCOLATE DREAMS
    Harvard entrepreneurs offer Parisians a new way to indulge.
    BY DON BOROUGHS

  • SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE:
    Information about ASEE's 2010 ANNUAL CONFERENCE & Exposition, including workshops, distinguished lecturers, and special tours. Find out why Louisville, Kentucky, is the place to be in mid-June

February 2010: SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE

www.prism-magazine.org/feb10 »

February 2010

 

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January 2010

www.prism-magazine.org/jan10

January 2010
  • SHORING UP
    Federal aid to states and grants to researchers may bring only temporary relief to universities.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE AND BERYL LIEFF BENDERLY


  • ONE IN A HUNDRED
    The Senate's only engineer has his work cut out, and not much time.
    BY PAUL WEST

  • NOT WHAT STUDENTS NEED
    A major study questions whether engineering undergraduates are being prepared for 21st-century careers.
    BY MARY LORD

 

December 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/dec09

December 2009

 

November 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/nov09

November 2009
  • RAISING THE ROOF
    The ‘nation’s attic’ undergoes a high-tech renovation.
    BY ROBIN TATU


  • TIME & TIDE
    Rising sea levels wait for no man. Will we be ready in time?
    BY DAVID ZAX

  • THOSE WHO CAN, TEACH
    Campus centers whet instructors’ appetite for a fresh approach.
    BY MARY LORD

 

October 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/oct09

October 2009

  • THE CYBER GRID
    Information technology will give America's electrical system a needed charge — but it won't happen overnight.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE


  • PROJECTING A CAN-DO SPIRIT
    Once drawn to movie-making, ASEE's president remains a man of action.
    BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

  • ALL IN THE FAMILY
    To reach the next generation of engineers, involve the parents, too.
    BY MARGARET LOFTUS

 

September 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/sept09

September 2009

  • EXPANDING HORIZONS
    From energy and climate to cancer and aerospace, the Obama White House has ambitious research plans. But not all win favor with skeptics in Congress.
    BY BOYCE RENSBERGER


  • EMERGENCY RESPONSE
    Crisis engineers bring needed skills and order to disaster zones, easing victims' plight with water, shelter, and sanitation systems.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • EXPOSED!
    The quiet field of life-cycle assessments hits the mainstream, measuring the environmental impact of what we make.
    BY DON BOROUGHS

 

Summer 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/summer09

Summer 2009

  • A PLACE IN THE SUN
    Seeking escape from the rust belt, Michigan and its universities try to grow a green economy.
    BY DON BOROUGHS


  • SHADOWED BY THE PAST
    Outmoded Soviet-era practices still hamper teaching and innovation in Eastern Europe.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • WAY TO GO
    Forget horsepower, high speed, and rumbling exhaust systems. You won’t see these vehicles at NASCAR. Instead, thrill to inventive technology, zero or low emissions, and quirky looks.

 

APRIL 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/apr09

APRIL 2009
 

  • FLIGHT TO ACHIEVEMENT
    With cash incentives and coaching, a Texas-based initiative dramatically improves minorities’ success in science and math.
    BY MARGARET LOFTUS


  • TEAMING WITH IDEAS
    Engineering students go global, designing solutions while competing for cash.
    BY MARK MATTHEWS

  • HELP! I NEED SOME ’BOT-Y
    Japan’s robots build cars and entertain youngsters. Can they care for the old and the sick?
    BY LUCILLE CRAFT

MARCH 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/mar09

MARCH 2009
 

  • THE PULL OF INTEGRITY
    Sure, you can catch cheaters. But why not inspire students to stay honest?
    BY CHARLES Q. CHOI


  • HANDS AND MINDS
    An engineering-inspired school curriculum, A World in Motion, connects standards-based theory with practical invention.
    BY MARY LORD

  • YES, WEPAN
    A network challenges the barriers and biases that continue to discourage women engineers.
    BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

 

FEBRUARY 2009: SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE

www.prism-magazine.org/feb09

FEBRUARY 2009
 

  • LIFELINE TO THE STATES
    A federal stimulus package will ease some of the pain felt by public universities. Still, budget and enrollment cuts loom, along with tuition hikes.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • ‘QUANTS’ TAKE THE HEAT
    A global credit crisis exposes the pitfalls of financial engineering.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • A DOWNER FOR ENDOWMENTS
    As their investments sink along with the stock market, rich universities are under less pressure to spend. But charges of “hoarding” may resurface.
    BY BERYL LIEFF BENDERLY

FEBRUARY 2009: SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE

www.prism-magazine.org/feb09

FEBRUARY 2009
 

  • AUSTIN: WEIRD, WILD, AND WESTERN
    From honky-tonks to high tech, the Lone Star capital throbs with energy and variety.
    BY ROBIN TATU

  • STAKE YOUR CLAIM IN AUSTIN
    Join the American Society for Engineering Education in the Live Music Capital of the World – Austin, Texas – for the 116th Annual ASEE Conference and Exposition!

  • CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE
    ASEE K-12 Workshop, Registration, Workshops, Business Meetings, Technical Sessions, Main Plenary and more!

JANUARY 2009

www.prism-magazine.org/jan09

DECEMBER 2008
 

  • MILLIONS LOG IN
    After five years, MIT's OpenCourseWare has a dedicated following — and many imitators. But it struggles with costs and copyrights.
    BY DON BOROUGHS

  • A LEVEL HEAD
    Kathy Sykes, professor and BBC star, fosters a rational debate between scientists and the British public.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • DESERT ADVANCE
    Saudi Arabia and its Persian Gulf neighbors are importing Western-style teaching and research — at a rapid pace.
    BY STEPHEN GLAIN

DECEMBER 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/dec08

DECEMBER 2008
 

  • WHILE SUPPLIES LAST
    Research engineers are finding new ways to produce more fresh water and to recycle what’s been used.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • WORKING THE CROWD
    The Internet brings a world of talent to solving engineering problems.
    BY ROBIN TATU

  • POLYMERS TO POETRY
    Engineering programs at traditional liberal arts colleges give students the best of both worlds.
    BY MARGARET LOFTUS

NOVEMBER 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/nov08

NOVEMBER 2008
 

  • TALE OF TWO CAMPUSES
    Separated by decades of conflict, Israel’s Technion and Gaza’s Islamic University each strives in its own way to prepare 21st century engineers.
    PART ONE: ISRAEL | PART TWO: GAZA
    BY MARK MATTHEWS

  • WHEN DISASTER STRIKES
    Recovering from Katrina´s damage, two New Orleans engineering schools make emergency preparation a priority.
    BY MARY LORD

OCTOBER 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/oct08

OCTOBER 2008
 

  • LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS
    Engineers offer ways to get American healthcare off the ‘critical’ list.
    BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • WHO'S GOT IT RIGHT?
    In science, technology and education, both Barack Obama and John McCain would bring change. But how? That’s where they diverge.
    BY GUY GUGLIOTTA

  • UNTAPPED POTENTIAL
    Fewer than 5% of engineering graduates are African-American. Now, some schools and organizations are working to change that, with specialized camps and academic incentives. Will it be enough?
    BY MARGARET LOFTUS

SEPTEMBER 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/sept08

SEPTEMBER 2008
 

  • GREENER & SAFER
    Researchers devise new technologies to protect troops, including a trash–to–energy refinery. But a solution to roadside bombs remains elusive.
    BY MEGAN SCULLY - ILLUSTRATION BY STUART BRIERS

  • SUBTLE CHANGE AGENT
    ASEE’s president has expanded opportunities in engineering through persuasion, mentoring and leading by example.
    BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

  • PREMIUM PRICES
    A growing number of colleges charge students higher tuition for engineering. What does this mean for low-income students and the future of U.S. technology?
    BY BERYL LIEFF BENDERLY

SUMMER 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/summer08

SUMMER 2008
 

  • COVER STORY: Earth, Wind and Science
    IN JUST SEVEN YEARS, SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING—TECHNOLOGY TO PROTECT THE PLANET WHILE RAISING LIVING STANDARDS—HAS CAUGHT FIRE WITH STUDENTS AND PROFESSORS ACROSS THE U.S. - BY CORINNA WU

  • FEATURE: Double Whammy
    SOUTH AFRICA IS DESPERATE FOR TRAINED ENGINEERS, BUT ITS STUDENTS FACE MAJOR OBSTACLES: POOR HIGH SCHOOL PREPARATION—A LEGACY OF APARTHEID—AND LOSS OF INSTRUCTORS TO HIGH-PAYING INDUSTRY JOBS. - BY DON BOROUGHS

  • FEATURE: 3…2…1…
    LURING WEALTHY THRILL-SEEKERS INTO SPACE, AN EXPANDING GROUP OF COMPANIES OFFERS OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD ADVENTURES, PRICED FROM $100,000 TO $100 MILLION.

APRIL 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/apr08

APRIL 2008
 

  • COVER STORY: Grief, Grit & Grace
    A YEAR AFTER AMERICA’S DEADLIEST MASS SHOOTING SHATTERED ITS RANKS AND SHUTTERED ITS MAIN BUILDING, VIRGINIA TECH’S COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING HAS PREVAILED—EVEN TRIUMPHED—OVER TRAGEDY. - BY MARY LORD

  • FEATURE: Beyond the Blueprint
    BOEING, DASSAULT AND GEORGIA TECH TRAIN TOMORROW’S ENGINEERS FOR THE HIGH-FLYING, FAST-CHANGING WORLD OF VIRTUAL DESIGN. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: Not Now, Voyager
    THE FALLEN DOLLAR HAS BUFFETED OVERSEAS STUDIES PROGRAMS, CAUSING STUDENTS TO LOOK BEYOND EUROPE OR SHORTEN THEIR STINTS ABROAD. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

MARCH 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/mar08

MARCH 2008
 

  • COVER STORY: Help Wanted
    SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS ONCE HAD TO COMPETE FOR COVETED FEDERAL JOBS. NOW THE GOVERNMENT MUST COMPETE WITH THE PRIVATE SECTOR TO ATTRACT THE BEST AND BRIGHTEST. - BY JEFFREY SELINGO

  • FEATURE: Caroline Baillie
    AN ENGINEER CAMPAIGNS ON TWO FRONTS: AGAINST POVERTY IN ARGENTINA AND OLD-STYLE TEACHING AT HOME. - BY MARGARET LOFTUS

  • FEATURE: Route to the Top
    A FIFTH OF THE TOP EXECUTIVES AT AMERICA’S BIGGEST COMPANIES ARE ENGINEERS. ONE REASON: THEIR HARD-NOSED PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS HELP THE BOTTOM LINE. BY THOMAS K. GROSE

FEBRUARY 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/feb08

FEBRUARY 2008
 

  • COVER STORY: Staying on Track
    ENGINEERING SCHOOLS USED TO SHRUG OFF HIGH ATTRITION RATES. NOW THEY’RE WORKING TO HELP STUDENTS ACHIEVE EARLY—AND ENDURING—SUCCESS. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: The Sky's the Limit
    A SMALL NUMBER OF SCIENTISTS THINK THEY CAN RE-ENGINEER THE CLIMATE TO STALL OR REVERSE GLOBAL WARMING. BUT TO ENVIRONMENTALISTS, SUCH IDEAS ARE HERESY. - BY CORINNA WU

  • FEATURE: Harvard Turns a Corner
    WITH THE RARE OPENING OF A NEW SCHOOL, THE UNIVERSITY RESTORES ENGINEERING TO ITS ONCE-PROMINENT SPOT. - BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

  • SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE: 2008 ASEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ISSUE
    2008 ASEE Annual Conference - June 22 - 25, 2008 - Pittsburgh, PA
    Learn more about ASEE's 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, including workshops, distinguished lecturers and special tours. Find out why Pittsburgh is the place to be in late June.

JANUARY 2008

www.prism-magazine.org/jan08

JANUARY 2008
 

  • COVER STORY: Game of Chance
    TO STAY COMPETITIVE, AMERICA NEEDS A LEADER COMMITTED TO MAKING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY A PRIORITY, EDUCATORS SAY. BUT NONE OF THE 2008 CANDIDATES OFFERS A SURE BET. - BY JEFFREY SELINGO- BY JEFFREY SELINGO

  • FEATURE: Extreme Learning
    CAR BOMBS, TSUNAMI SHELTERS, SPACE ROBOTS—UNIVERSITY LABS ARE MAKING THE STUDY OF ENGINEERING EVER MORE REAL. WHO WOULDN’T GET DRAWN IN WITH HANDS-ON PROJECTS LIKE THESE? - BY MARY LORD

  • FEATURE: Too Little Respect
    BRITISH ENGINEERS, ONCE THE PRIDE OF AN EMPIRE, ARE TYPECAST BY THE PUBLIC AND RARELY REACH THE EXECUTIVE SUITE. EDUCATORS EXPLORE CURRICULUM CHANGES TO GIVE THE PROFESSION A BOOST. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

DECEMBER 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/dec07

DECEMBER 2007
 

  • COVER STORY: Why Won’t She Listen?
    JUST WHEN WOMEN START TO MAKE THEIR MARK AS ENGINEERING EDUCATORS, YOUNG FEMALE STUDENTS ARE TUNING THEM OUT. - BY MARGARET LOFTUS

  • FEATURE: A Practical Visionary
    RICHARD LIEBICH BROUGHT BUSINESS SAVVY TO THE TASK OF PREPARING YOUNG STUDENTS FOR COLLEGE ENGINEERING. - BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

  • FEATURE: Taking the Plunge
    THE FIRST ENGINEERING GRADUATES OF OLIN COLLEGE SAY THE SCHOOL’S EMPHASIS ON TEAMWORK AND INNOVATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING GAVE THEM A LEG UP ON CHALLENGING CAREERS. - BY ANNA MULRINE

NOVEMBER 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/nov07

NOVEMBER 2007
 

  • COVER STORY: ‘Patch and Pray’ -
    AMERICA’S NEGLECT OF ITS INFRASTRUCTURE HAS ALREADY PRODUCED FATAL DISASTER AND ECONOMIC LOSS. RESEARCH CAN EASE THE PROBLEM, BUT SUCCESS REQUIRES MORE MONEY, SPENT MORE WISELY. BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: GM Shifts Gears
    SHEDDING OUTDATED DESIGN PRACTICES, THE AUTO GIANT ENLISTS THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN TO DEVELOP A WORLDWIDE POOL OF ENGINEERS TRAINED IN CROSS-CULTURAL TEAMWORK. BY MARY LORD

  • FEATURE: Eye on the World
    CALL IT ‘GLOBALISM FOR GEARHEADS.’ A UNIVERSITY-STATE-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP IN CALIFORNIA CREATES TECHNOLOGY—FROM NEW CANCER TREATMENT TO INTERNET ACCESS FOR POOR CAMBODIANS—THAT IS BOTH GROUNDBREAKING AND SOCIALLY USEFUL. BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

 

OCTOBER 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/oct07

OCTOBER 2007
 

  • COVER STORY: BANGALORE-JOLT
    INDIA’S RAPID HIGH-TECH GROWTH HAS FUELED A HUGE DEMAND FOR WELL-TRAINED ENGINEERS. STARTUPS, INDUSTRY, RETURNING EXPATRIATES AND EVEN A SPIRITUAL LEADER—THE ‘HUGGING SAINT’—OFFER INNOVATIVE WAYS TO FILL THE VOID. BUT ARE THEIR EFFORTS ENOUGH? BY LUCILLE CRAFT

  • FEATURE: 2 FOR 1
    IN PUTTING ITS BUSINESS AND ENGINEERING SCHOOLS UNDER ONE ROOF, PENN STATE BEHREND AIMS TO FOSTER CREATIVE TEAMWORK WHILE MAKING ITS STUDENTS ATTRACTIVE TO INDUSTRY. BY MARY LORD

  • FEATURE: EDUCATOR FOR THE REAL WORLD
    JIM MELSA WANTED TO CHANGE HOW ENGINEERING IS TAUGHT, EVEN IF IT MADE HIM ‘A PAIN IN THE NECK.’ BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

SEPTEMBER 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/sept07

September 2007
 

SUMMER 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/summer07

Summer 2007
 

  • COVER STORY: Cream of the Crop
    Engineering students usually stick close to home for their training, but more are finding that experience abroad gives them a distinct advantage in the eyes of employers. - BY MARGARET LOFTUS

  • FEATURE: Hero by Nature
    Hero by Nature - UC Berkeley professor Jay Keasling takes his farm-grown work ethic to the fight against malaria. - BY ALICE DANIEL

  • FEATURE: Wringing Gold From the Old
    Wringing Gold From the Old - Rochester Institute of Technology’s remanufacturing expertise helps turn used widgets into good-as-new wonders. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

APRIL 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/apr07

April 2007
 

MARCH 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/mar07

February 2007
 

  • COVER STORY: Role Reversal
    WHILE GETTING ACCEPTED TO A FOUR-YEAR ENGINEERING PROGRAM CAN BE DIFFICULT, ONCE THEY’RE IN, COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS PROVE THEIR WORTH AND WIN OVER UNIVERSITY SKEPTICS. BY JEFFREY SELINGO

  • FEATURE: Where the Action Is
    THERE ARE A NUMBER OF REASONS WHY COMPANIES ARE OUTSOURCING THEIR R&D ABROAD. THE COUNTRY’S MARKET APPEAL IS ONE OF THEM. BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: Mostly Sunny Skies
    AFTER WEATHERING SEVERE BUDGET CUTS, STATE SPENDING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IS ON THE RISE AS LEGISLATORS REALIZE THE CRUCIAL ROLE UNIVERSITIES PLAY IN THE STATE’S ECONOMY. BY THOMAS K. GROSE

FEBRUARY 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/feb07

February 2007
 

  • COVER STORY: Meeting of the Minds
    APPLYING THEIR PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS TO HEALTHCARE, ENGINEERS ARE CHANGING MODERN MEDICINE. BY BETHANY HALFORD

  • FEATURE: Girl Power
    THE GIRLS SCOUTS ARE WORKING HARD TO ATTRACT GIRLS TO ENGINEERING. BY LYNNE SHALLCROSS

  • FEATURE: A Man of Big IDEOS
    STANFORD’S DAVID KELLEY URGES HIS STUDENTS NOT TO THINK LIKE A TYPICAL ENGINEER WHEN IT COMES TO DESIGN. BY ALICE DANIEL

  • SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE
    ASEE's 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, including workshops, distinguished lecturers and special tours. Find out why Hawaii is the place to be in late June.

JANUARY 2007

www.prism-magazine.org/jan07

January 2007
 

  • FEATURE: 21st Century Prof.
    NEW FACULTY MEMBERS ARE EXPECTED TO DO IT ALL—RAISE LARGE SUMS OF MONEY TO FUND RESEARCH PROJECTS AND EXCEL IN THE CLASSROOM AS WELL. BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: Counting on Them
    THERE WERE FEW MISHAPS IN THE MIDTERM ELECTIONS, BUT COMPUTER ENGINEERS SAY THAT DOESN’T MEAN VOTING MACHINES AREN’T FRAUGHT WITH RISKS. BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: A Man of Vision
    PENN STATE ENGINEERING DEAN DAVID WORMLEY OVERSEES ONE OF THE NATION’S LARGEST ENGINEERING PROGRAMS AND SERVES AS PRESIDENT OF ASEE. BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

DECEMBER 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/dec06

December 2006
 

  • COVER STORY: A Future Engineer?
    To stay competitive, the U.S. needs to attract more Hispanics to engineering, and there are a number of programs doing just that. - By Margaret Loftus

  • FEATURE: Please Don’t Go
    Europe is trying to boost its research funding so PH.D.’s don’t leave for better opportunities in the United States. - By Thomas K. Grose

  • FEATURE: Japan’s Slow-Moving Tide
    A few professors are pushing for curriculum change in Japan’s tightly regulated world of academe. - By Lucille Craft

NOVEMBER 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/nov06

November 2006
 


OCTOBER 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/oct06

October 2006
 


SEPTEMBER 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/sept06

SEPTEMBER 2006
 

  • COVER STORY: Booting Up
    In Texas, top levels of government, industry and academia work together to attract more engineers. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE

  • FEATURE: Woman of the World
    As head of the World Bank Institute, engineer Frannie Léautier can make a real difference. - BY PIERRE HOME-DOUGLAS

  • FEATURE: Getting in Gear
    Mexico enrolls over 450,000 students in engineering programs and may become a player in the global economy. - BY JEFFREY SELINGO

Summer 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/summer06

Summer 2006
 

  • MAY I HELP YOU? - More and more engineering schools are embracing service learning as a way to prepare students for the real world. By Jeffrey Selingo

  • FERTILE NEW GROUND - An increasing number of researchers are looking into how engineering students learn. By Thomas K. Grose

  • FEAST OR FAMINE? - The nation’s R&D budget will shrink for fiscal year 2007, but there are some bright spots. By Thomas K. Grose

  • TOUR DE FACTORY - A behind-the-scenes look at some of the nation’s most interesting factories.

April 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/apr06

April 2006 

  • ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
    More and more engineering deans are moving into the ranks of provosts. What’s behind the new trend? - By Alvin P. Sanoff

  • SHAKY GROUND
    Civil engineering professor Peter Nicholson, who investigated levee failures in New Orleans, reminds us that the nation has many infrastructure problems. - By Pierre Home-Douglas

  • THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT
    Today, distance education takes many forms, including beaming classes across campus. - By Nancy Shute



March 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/mar06

March 2006
 

  • TO THE RESCUE
    Engineers use their skills to help solve the problems of the developing world. - By Anna Mulrin.

  • ON THE MOVE
    Ireland’s tech-based economy means that many more engineers will be needed. - By Thomas K. Grose

  • THE HOUSE THAT KIM BUILT
    Jeong H. Kim is part of a new breed of entrepreneurs whose generosity has helped to create state-of-the-art engineering programs. - By Mary Lord



ADVERTISEMENTS
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February 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/feb06

February 2006
 

SPECIAL DOUBLE ISSUE:

  • FEBRUARY 2006 ISSUE:
    Time-consuming wrangling with industry over intellectual property issues are making negotiations more difficult.

  • SPECIAL 2006 ASEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ISSUE:
    2006 ANNUAL CONFERENCE
    JUNE 18-21, 2006
    Chicago, Illinois


January 2006

www.prism-magazine.org/jan06

PRISM - January 2006
 

  • A NEW ERA - Concerns about global warming and oil shortages are making nuclear energy more attractive. - By Corinna Wu

  • A POWERFUL FORCE - Ioannis Miaoulis is using the Boston Museum of Science to intoduce engineering to children at a young age. By Alice Daniel

  • A MIND FOR DESIGN - Engineering psychology—a discipline that looks at the why behind the design. By Pierre Home-Douglas


December 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/dec05

PRISM - December 2005
 

  • WAVE OF INFLUENCE - Three foundations have had a major impact on biomedical engineering, entrepreneurship and distance education. - By Jeffrey Selingo

  • SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE - The Bachelor of Arts degree in engineering is for people who want to be conversant in technology, but not necessarily engineers. - By Anna Mulrine

  • ENGINEERING? ¡SÍ! - A program popping up in many high schools draws Latino and other underrepresented students into engineering. - By Margaret Loftus


November 2005
SPECIAL ISSUE: The Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

www.prism-magazine.org/nov05

PRISM - November 2005 

  • SPECIAL ISSUE: The Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
    DOWN, BUT NOT OUT
    - Thanks to Katrina, Tulane and the University of New Orleans have had to find other ways to get their students into the classroom. - By Thomas K. Grose, Mary Lord and Lynne Shallcross

  • DIVINE INTERVENTION - Cornell’s W. Kent Fuchs almost didn’t pursue an engineering career. His first choice was the ministry. - By Alvin P. Sanoff

  • FIRST TO FILE - Major changes that appear underway in the U.S. patent system would reward the first applicant to get in the paperwork.  - By Bethany Halford


October 2005
SPECIAL ISSUE: Women in Engineering

www.prism-magazine.org/oct05

PRISM October 2005
  • COMPETING FORCES - What can we learn from medicine, business and law, all of which do a better job than engineering at attracting women? By Alvin P. Sanoff

  • MAKING IT THROUGH THE MAZE - Women find themselves going around a lot of blind corners when it comes to getting tenure. By Mary Lord

  • OPENING DOORS - Stanford engineering professor Sheri Sheppard knows what it’s like to be the only female faculty member in the department. By Alice Daniel



September 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/sept05

PRISM September 2005
  • Coming to America - From terminology to résumé pointers, Cooper Union’s job-oriented retraining program helps immigrant engineers build their American dreams. By Mary Lord

  • Planting the Seed - eBay's first president, Jeffrey Skoll, helps University of Toronto students build stronger engineering careers–with business. By Pierre Home-Douglas

  • Jolly Good Fellow - University of Sheffield’s Noel Sharkey made his name in robotics. Now he’s using bots to sell young Brits on engineering. By Thomas K. Grose



Summer 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/summer05

PRISM Summer 2005
  • THE REAL WORLD - Six Smith College grads recount their experiences during their first year as engineers. And they react to Harvard President Larry Summers' recent comments. By Anna Mulrine

  • CUTTING THE GORDIAN KNOT - After the federal government began restricting funding for stem-cell research, a number of states jumped in to take up the slack, but a lack of coordination among states could lead to limited results. By Jeffrey Selingo

  • MAKING IT BIG - As world consumption of materials steadily increases, mining education graduates are few in number and highly pursued. By Corinna Wu

  • RISING AGAIN - As the last of the World Trade Center buildings to fall, Seven WTC held its ground until just after 5 p.m. on Sept. 11, 2001. And almost four years later, it's the first making its way back up. Photographs by Sylvia Plachy

April 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/apr05

PRISM April 2005
  • THE NEXT REVOLUTION: China has set its sights on becoming a world leader in engineering, and the college campus is the breeding ground for reform. By Lucille Craft

  • SEND IN THE ENGINEERS: Soon after the tsunami disaster, U.S. researchers headed to flood-ravaged Sri Lanka to learn what they could about mitigating such destruction in the future. By Thomas K. Grose

  • FROM THE WHITE HOUSE TO THE PRESIDENCY: Purdue President Martin Jischke recognized early on that he could better serve society by assuming leadership positions. By Alvin P. Sanoff

March 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/mar05

PRISM March 2005
  • THE MECHANICS OF A CAREER: Six highly accomplished educators tell why they became engineers.
    By Thomas K. Grose

  • A CLICK AWAY: A new online collection of hands-on engineering lessons and activities is up and running.
    By Barbara Mathias-Riegel

  • YOU CALL THIS SCHOOL?: Undergraduates at Caltech are SURFing their way to innovative research.
    By Pierre Home-Douglas

February 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/feb05

PRISM February 2005
  • February 2005 issue: Between 2003-2004, applications from abroad to U.S. graduate engineering schools declined 36 percent. Post 9/11 visa restrictions continue to discourage foreign applicants.

  • Special 2005 ASEE Annual Conference Issue:
    2005 ASEE Annual Conference June 12-15 - Portland, Oregon Discover Portland

  • Engineering's New Look: The engineering department at the University of Texas-San Antonio has done an impressive job of attracting minorities to its program. By Thomas K. Grose

January 2005

www.prism-magazine.org/jan05

PRISM January 2005
  • Lending a Hand: Retention is a big issue in engineering education, and more schools are developing programs to keep students from dropping out. - By Margaret Loftus

  • Crafting a New Curriculum: Hands-on learning has taken Japanese engineering education by storm, gaining a cachet somewhere between motherhood and sushi.- By Lucille Craft

  • Measure for Measure: Despite its liberal arts focus, Alverno College may be able to tell engineering schools a bit about assessment. - By Alvin P. Sanoff

December 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/dec04

PRISM December 2004
  • Engineering For Everyone: Everyone needs to know about engineering, and more and more schools are teaching the basics to nonengineers. - By Bethany Halford

  • Model Behavior: Vanderbilt professor Peter Cummings is developing one of the most accurate models of water ever created. - By Pierre Home-Douglas

  • Answering the Call: Aerospace and defense companies are working to get more youngsters into the engineering pipeline. - By Robert Gardner

November 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/nov04

PRISM November 2004
  • Above the Fray: Bucking the trend in higher education, engineering departments have yet to employ nontenured "contingent" faculty in significant numbers. - By Thomas K. Grose

  • The Water Guy: First, Virginia Tech professor Marc Edwards discovered dangerously high levels of lead in Washington, D.C.'s, drinking water. Then he had to persuade the bureaucracy to get the word out. - By Pierre Home-Douglas

  • Storm Riders: Thanks to hurricanes like Charley and Francis, engineering students in Florida get real-world research experience with hurricanes—and are making houses safer in the process. - By Stephen Budiansky


October 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/oct04

PRISM October 2004
  • Sweating the Small Stuff: Nanotechnology has the potential to greatly improve our lives, and schools are scrambling to figure out how to teach it. By Corinna Wu

  • East Side Story: The digital divide in Europe is pretty wide, and the former Eastern bloc countries are information technology "have-nots." By Thomas K. Grose

  • True Grit: University of Colorado professor Jackie Sullivan has forged a remarkably successful career, from climbing the corporate ladder at EDS to turning youngsters on to engineering. By Mary Lord



September 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/sept04

PRISM September 2004
  • The Cheating Culture: Professors say that college students are cheating now more than ever. And engineering students are no exception. By Jeffrey Selingo

  • Remade in Japan: Japan is working to improve the quality of engineering education, which has slipped in recent years so that grads are no longer guaranteed jobs. By Lucille Craft

  • Revolutionary Approach: To build the unmanned X-45 fighter, Boeing and Northrup Grumman are experimenting with a new design process: spiral development. By Stephen Budiansky



Summer 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/may2004

  • Expanding the Mind: Creativity is such an integral part of being an engineer, but how on Earth do you teach it?
  • Pure Motion: How Cornell University's engineers, mathematicians, and librarians are bringing the Reuleaux models to the world.
  • An Engineer First: After leaving his boot print on the moon, Neil Armstrong returned to what got him there and back - engineering.
  • Lights, Camera, Trains: Engineering was good training for photographer O. Winston Link, particularly when it came to shooting fast-moving steam engines in the dark of the night.


April 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/april04/

  • High School Goes High Tech: Until recently, high schools that catered to students gifted in math and science were few and far between, but now they're popping up all over the place.
  • The Voice of Engineering: Bill Hammack uses the airwaves to emphasize engineering in everyday life.
  • The Power of One: A single cyber-thief can steal millions worldwide with a few clicks of a keyboard, but engineering schools are coming up with ways to fight back.

 




MArch 2004 CoverMarch 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/mar04/

  • A New Kind of Engineer(x): The pharmaceutical industry needed someone who could manage the expensive task of developing drugs. Enter the pharmaceutical engineer.
  • 114th and Success: The street signs outside young Yvonne Freeman's window were prophetic in foreseeing her future as an extraordinary mentor for youngsters in science, math - and engineering.
  • Toys that Teach: Teachers are discovering that toys like Slinkys and yo-yo's may be better than books when it comes to teaching kids about engineering.

February 2004 coverFebruary 2004 - Special Annual Conference Issue

www.prism-magazine.org/feb04/

  • Opening a New Book: Today's engineering students must be able to communicate well, work in teams, and take societal concerns into account. The question for educators is how to teach these skills.
  • Miracle Workers : Bioengineers are developing micro-electronic devices that could lead to amazing medical breakthroughs, including rudimentary sight recognition for the blind and, for the paralyzed, the ability to reach and grab.
  • Few and Far Between: Females students are hard to find in engineering technology program but schools are working to address the problem.
  • Soaring in Salt Lake City: Breathtaking natural beauty, world-class restaurants, shops, museums, and family history. Salt Lake City has it all.
  • What's Cooking: Salt Lake City Dining Guide

January 2004

www.prism-magazine.org/jan04/

  • Putting it into Perspective: Globalization has hit the engineering workforce hard in the United States, but the nation's strongest assets - innovation and creativity - should help keep its competitive edge.
  • Painting Everyone Into The Picture: Princeton's new engineering dean Maria Klawe wants to broaden engineering so that all the school's undergraduates learn about the impact of technology on society.
  • Wizardry at Work: Joel Spira and his wife, Ruth, have always believed in the importance of engineering education. They have been giving out awards for teaching excellence for 20 years and are still going strong today.

December 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/dec03/

  • My Job Lies Over The Ocean: Globalization is helping to strengthen economies abroad by creating high-tech jobs at wages too low for American workers - and U.S. engineers are starting to feel the effects.
  • The De-Ice Man Cometh: A Canadian professor of mechanical engineering has given aircraft designers a powerful tool to help minimize the dangerous effects of ice forming on wings during flight.
  • Connecting the Dots: A professor at Rice University has developed an electronic textbook of sorts that could become the model for engineering education.
  • Nominations for 2004 ASEE Elections

 


Nov3 2003 CoverNovember 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/nov03/

  • Munching on Hazardous Waste: Cleaning up toxic waste is a huge job in the United States. Engineering researchers are putting microbes to work consuming toxic contaminants.
  • Taking A Crack at Predicting Quakes: Researchers are studying ways to process the mountains of real-time data on earthquakes - all in an effort to improve their dismal record of forecasting them.
  • Pursuing New Paths: The number of chemical engineering grads continues to decline, but that may be partly because students are being wooed away to bioengineering departments.
  • Toy Story: An engineer has made a career out of creating hot-selling toys such as Fur-Real, a lifelike cat that can hiss and flex its back when provoked.

October 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/oct03/

  • Proceed With Caution: The debate about academic researchers getting too cozy with industry rages on. It's a relationship that can work, however, if certain rules are followed.
  • The Corps at a Crossroad: While the Army Corps of Engineers has been charged with helping to rebuild Iraq, the venerable agency finds itself in trouble at home. It has turned to engineering educators for help.
  • A Model For Success: Stanford's Tom Byers has plenty of experience as an entrepreneur and now he's teaching engineering students how to navigate the complex world of business.

 



September 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/sept03/

  • The Winning Edge: Engineering researchers helped the U. S. triumph on the battlefield of Iraq and will play a crucial role in transforming the military of the future.
  • The Phoenix Man: The person who supervised the massive and complex cleanup at the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks was - what else? An engineer.
  • Clean Machines: Hydrogen-powered cars may be one answer to the nation's pollution problems, but the technology is still more than a decade down the road.

 


PRISM May 2003May-June 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/mayjune03/

  • The Graduate: Educators Struggle to prepare well-rounded engineers for today's workplace.
  • Engineers, Start Your Engines: NASCAR drivers used to rely on self-taught mechanics to supe up their engines, but now that NASCAR is really big business, they are turning to engineers for the winning edge.
  • Magnetic Fields: Attracting more women to engineering is just as problematic for Canada as it is for this country, but our northern neighbors have managed to boost their numbers by designing new programs in areas like microelectronics.
  • All The President's Friends: You might think that running a top-ranked undergraduate engineering program would be Rose-Hulman President Sam Hulbert's greatest achievement, but his real genius may be his warmth. Incredibly, he's on a first-name basis with most of the school's 1,800 students.
  • 2003 Annual Conference - Nashville: Hitting A High Note in Nashville: You don't have to love the twang of steel guitars to enjoy this sophisticated southern city that has plenty to offer in the way of history, culture, and just plain fun. But if country music is your thing, you're going to be in heaven.

April 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/april03/

  • Can Distance Education Be Unlocked? : Only a handful of schools offer undergraduate engineering degrees online, and there's some very good reasons why more haven't taken the plunge.
  • A New Era: One of the goals of ABET 2000 is to make engineering education more relevant to society. A byproduct of the new criteria may be that it's making the profession more appealing to women.
  • Blazing an Entrepreneurial Trail: Engineering students who graduate from Michigan Tech's Enterprise Program have a choice. They can work for someone else or they can start their own companies.

 


Prism March 2003March 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/mar03/

  • America's Newest Export: U.S. engineering schools are gradually venturing into the global marketplace - setting up shop in countries such as France, Greece, Singapore, and even China.
  • Scaling The Ranks: Former Pentagon official Delores Etter may well be the most sought after engineer in the power corridor of the nation's capital.
  • Palace of Science: A fascinating new book tells the story of Alfred Lee Loomis, a visionary who set up a world-class private lab that laid the groundwork for detection technologies that changed the course of World War II.
  • The Sky's the Limit: The new Joint Strike Fighter is one of the most sophisticated war machines ever conceived and may also change the way engineering is taught.

February 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/feb03/

  • Getting Down to Business: European educators haven't been as entrepreneurial as their American counterparts, but now they are jumping on the research park bandwagon in a big way.
  • An Unsettling State of Affairs: New security regulations initiated in the aftermath of Sept 11 are creating havoc for engineering researchers across the country.
  • Down & Out in Afghanistan: Engineering has hit rock bottom in this war-ravaged nation, leaving educators anguishing over how to train desperately needed engineers when the nation's schools are on life support.

 


January 2003

www.prism-magazine.org/jan03/

  • High Tech Hunting: The Pentagon's controversial Information Awareness Office breaks its silence about plans to use technology to stop tomorrow's terrorists.
  • Engineers For All Seasons: Olin College is a different kind of engineering school.
  • Shrinking Assets: With university endowment funds continuing to erode, many colleges and universities will be forced to make deep spending cuts, probably beginning in 2004.

 


December 2002December 2002

www.prism-magazine.org/dec02/

  • A Whole New Ball Game: Engineers Take Competition to a New Level.
  • Up In Smoke: The experts say that existing technology can reduce the carbon dioxide emissions that may cause global warming, but it's very expensive, and the United States isn't investing enough to make a difference.
  • A Contrarian For All Ages: University of South Carolina president Steve Sample is not your regular college president. Nor is he your regular engineer.
  • The Lure of Industry: Corporate America has become a magnet for engineering innovations, but many don't want to leave academia altogether.

 


November 2002November 2002

www.prism-magazine.org/nov02/

  • The ABC's of Engineering - Reaching Out To Kids: A number of innovative programs are underway to get kids excited about engineering, and they are just beginning to provide models that might be adopted by others.
  • All Things Great & Small: After realizing the incredible potential of nanotechnology, University of Toronto engineering professor Doug Perovic turned the study of this emerging field into an undergraduate major.
  • Hard Act To Follow: The architect of the new $55 million Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth is winning praise for his groundbreaking use of concrete, but much of the credit goes to the engineers who have developed new ways to use the age-old material.

October 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/oct02

  • Facing The Problem - Who's Missing in the Faculty Club? Everyone knows that engineering education has trouble attracting women, African-Americans, and Hispanics to its ranks. Now, a new study shows just how serious the situation is.
  • All The Right Moves: Freeman Hrabowski, who stands out among college presidents for showing minority youth how to be stellar engineers, mathematicians, and scientists, uses chess to get students excited about the intellectual process.
  • Natural Borne-Killers: Food poisoning can make you plenty sick - and even lead to death - but help is on the way. Engineers are developing new techniques that can destroy the deadly microorganisms that cause it.

September 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/sept02

  • Engineering Their Way To the Top: An MBA is no longer the only way to climb the corporate ladder. Engineers are moving into the upper echelons of business without straying far from their roots.
  • A Quiet Sort of Revolutionary: National Academy of Engineering president Bill Wulf may be soft spoken, but that doesn't keep him from calling for a major overhaul of engineering education.
  • Feeling the Pinch: Engineering schools around the nation are cutting back programs and handing out pink slips as states struggle with budget shortfalls.

May-June 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/mayjune02

  • Smart Parts - Artificial limbs
  • Missiles & Medicine
  • Leading the Way - Raymond Nkado
  • Behind the Screens
  • Special Annual Conference Issue - Old Meets new In Montreal

April 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/april02

  • In Living Color - Making a Splash in the Classroom with Digital Art
  • Lending Mother Nature a Hand
  • Change in Course

March 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/mar02

  • Down the Road - Automotive Engineers Pave the Way for Tomorrow's Car
  • A Criminal Act? - the Digital Millennium Copyright Act
  • Unequal Opportunity - Women engineers and scientists in Japan

February 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/feb02

  • Waging War - Engineers Fight Back in the Lab
  • 25 Ways to Fight Terrorism
  • Where is OTA when you need it? - the Office of Technology Assessment
  • Cool Under Fire - Chief Engineer of the USS Cole Deborah Courtney

January 2002

http://www.prism-magazine.org/jan02

  • Open For Business - Entrepreneurship After the Dot-Com Bust
  • Finally, a Little R&R
  • The Man Behind Merced - David Ashley
  • Fast Track for Trains

December 2001

http://www.prism-magazine.org/dec01

  • Ordering Science: The New Science of Bioinformatics
  • Spread the Word - Engineering Professor Emeritus John Lienhard
  • A Bumpy Road
  • Giants of the Sea

 


November 2001

http://www.prism-magazine.org/nov01

  • Take Me, Take My Spouse
  • Role Model for Diversity

 

 


October 2001

http://www.prism-magazine.org/oct01

  • Last Piece in the Puzzle
  • Staying Home
  • The Man Who's Betting the Store
  •  

     


    September 2001

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/sept01

  • Coping with the New Economy
  •  

     


    May-June 2001

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/may01

  • Science in Chains

  • Riding High in Albuquerque
  •  


    Prism Magazine -- April 2001April 2001

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/april01

  • Closing the Digital Divide
  • Enter Internet2
  • A Big Picture Guy

  • Prism Magazine -- March 2001March 2001

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/mar01/

  • Getting It Right
  • Playing the game
  • Finding His Way at UCLA

  • Prism - February 2001February 2001

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/feb01/

  • Making the Grade
  • Building Tomorrow's Workforce
  • The Trouble with Textbooks
  • A Curriculum That Works

  • Prism-January 2001January 2001

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/jan01/

  • The New Boomtowns
  • Collaborating with the Enemy
  • 21st Century Gold Rush

  • Prism-December  2000December 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/dec00/

  • Changing Course
  • Starting over at Sherbrooke
  • A Day in the Life of Dean Ilene

  • Prism-November  2000November 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/nov00/

  • Quantum Leap
  • An Untapped talent pool
  • Bill Joy's Bad Dream

  • Prism-October  2000October 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/oct00/

  • Getting Down to E-business
  • Food Fight in Europe
  • Prime Time for Engineering
  • Stepping up to the Plate

  • Prism- September 2000September 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/sept00/

  • A Tall Order at Olin College
  • Man on a Mission
  • The New Breed

  • Prism-May/june  2000May-June 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/may00/

  • Whose Property Is It Anyway?
  • Special Conference Issue

  • Prism-April 2000April 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/april00/

  • Time for the Makeover in Robotics
  • A Compromising Situation

  • Prism-March 2000March 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/march00

  • Finding Their Way
  • Re-engineering in Germany
  • The Dragon Slayer

  • Prism-February 2000February 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/feb00/    

  • Striking Back at Terrorism
  • NASA's Other Mission
  • The Poet Laureate of Technology
  • Reach for the Sky

  • Prism-January 2000January 2000

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/jan00/

  • Taking Care of Business
  • A Different Direction
  • Man in Motion

  • Prism-December 1999 December, 1999

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/dec99/

  • Engineering a New Age for the Elderly
  • Out of Pasture
  • Crime and Punishment Online

  • Prism-November 1999 November, 1999

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/nov99/

  • Engineers: The force Behind the New Economy
  • Her Brilliant Career
  • Distance Learning, the UK Way

  • Prism-October1999 October, 1999

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/oct99/

  • Education's new player
  • Jewel in the crown
  • Half empty or half full

  • Prism-September 1999 September,  1999

    http://www.prism-magazine.org/sept99/

  • Going the distance
  • Secrets of One of America's Best High Schools
  • Still learning after all these years

  • May/June, 1999 http://www.prism-magazine.org/mayjune/  

    April, 1999, http://www.prism-magazine.org/april/

    March, 1999, http://www.prism-magazine.org/march/

    February, 1999, http://www.prism-magazine.org/february/

    January, 1999, http://www.prism-magazine.org/january/index.html

    December, 1998, http://www.prism-magazine.org/december/index.htm

    November, 1998, http://www.prism-magazine.org/november/index.htm

    October, 1998,  http://www.prism-magazine.org/october/index.cfm

     

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