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ASEE PRISM
  American Society for Engineering Education
American Society for Engineering EducationAPRIL 2007Volume 16 | Number 8 PRISM HOMETABLE OF CONTENTSBACK ISSUES
FEATURES
Powering Up the Pipeline - Schools hope their innovative K-12 programs will propel more students into college engineering courses—and careers. - BY JEFFREY SELINGO
Germany’s Bright Flight - An engineering brain drain prompts Europe’s largest economy to seek reforms and coax its talented flock back to the nest. - BY THOMAS K. GROSE
Piercings, Not Pocket Protectors - Tufts engineering undergrads show young girls that engineering can be cool—just by being themselves. - BY MARGARET LOFTUS

DEPARTMENTS
COMMENTS
E-MAIL
BRIEFINGS
DATABYTES
REFRACTIONS: Diagnosing Dilbert - BY HENRY PETROSKI
CLASSIFIEDS
LAST WORD: The Power of “We”  - BY RAY M. HAYNES

TEACHING TOOLBOX
Live Green or Die - ENVIRONMENTALLY AWARE STUDENTS. GROWING GLOBAL NEEDS. CAN ENGINEERING SCHOOLS “GO GREEN” FAST ENOUGH TO SAVE OUR PLANET? - BY JO ELLEN MEYERS SHARP
YEAR OF DIALOGUE: - Tap Different Disciplines - BY WILLIAM A. WULF  AND NORMAN FORTENBERRY
ON CAMPUS: I Want My Therapy! Now! - BY LYNNE SHALLCROSS


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DATABYTES: DEGREES OF DIVERSITY - COMPILED BY MICHAEL GIBBONS - Data source: American Society for Engineering Education - INFOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION BY I-SHAN CHEN  
The number of bachelor's degrees in engineering increased for the 6th consecutive year in 2004-2005.  Overall, 73,602 undergraduates received degrees from engineering colleges. Women and foreign nationals received a smaller percentage of these degrees compared with the 1999-2000 academic year. Among African-Americans, women received 32 percent of degrees while Caucasian women received the smallest share of any ethnic group, with 16.6 percent. See www.asee.org/colleges for more information.

Data source: American Society for Engineering Education. More data can be found online at www.asee.org/colleges.



Bachelor's Degrees by Ethnicity and Gender in 2004-2005
ETHNICITY AND GENDER FEMALE MALE
African-American 1,149 2,427
Asian American 2,364 7,093
Hispanic* 1,182 3,629
Native American 73 272
Caucasian 7,386 37,087
Foreign National 1,220 4,284
Other 1,011 4,425
TOTALS 14,385 59,217
Note: * Includes 636 male and 315 femal graduates from schools in Puerto Rico.
Data source: American Society for Engineering Education. More data can be found online at
www.asee.org/colleges.



Percentage of Bachelor's Degrees Awarded by Ethnicity, Residency and Gender: 2005 and 2000
ETHNICITY 2000 2005
African-American
5.6% 5.3%
Hispanic
5.8% 5.8%
Other
8.5% 8.6%
Asian American
13.1% 14.1%
Caucasian
67.0% 66.2%
NATIONALITY 2000 2005
Foreign National 8.3% 7.5%
Domestic 91.7% 92.5%
GENDER 2000 2005
Female 20.8% 19.5%
Male 79.2% 80.5%
Data source: American Society for Engineering Education. More data can be found online at www.asee.org/colleges.



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American Society for Engineering Education
Bachelor's Degrees by Ethnicity and Gender in 2004-2005 Percentage of Bachelor's Degrees Awarded by Ethnicity, Residency and Gender: 2005 and 2000